Dhaake se vaapasi par-faiz ahmed faiz

For word meanings and explanatory discussion in English click on the tabs marked “Roman” or “Notes”.

ڈھاکہ سے واپسی پر ۔ فیض احمد فیضؔ

۱

ہم کہ ٹھہرے اجنبی اتنی مداراتوں کے بعد

پھر بنیں گے آشنا کتنی ملاقاتوں کے بعد

۲

کب نظر میں آئے گی بے داغ سبزے کی بہار

خون کے دھبے دھلیں گے کتنی برساتوں کے بعد

۳

تھے بہت بے درد لمحے ختمِ دردِ عشق کے

تھیں بہت بے مہر صبحیں مہرباں راتوں کے بعد

۴

دل تو چاہا پر شکستِ دل نے مہلت ہی نہ دی

کچھ گِلے شکوے بھی کر لیتے مُناجاتوں کے بعد

۵

اُن سے جو کہنے گئے تھے فیضؔ جاں صدقہ کیے

اَن کہی ہی رہ گئی وہ بات سب باتوں کے بعد

 

 

ढाके से वापसी पर – फ़ैज़ अहमद फ़ैज़

हम के ठहरे अजनबी इतनी मुदारातों के बा’द

फिर बनेंगे आश्ना कितनी मुलाक़ातों के बा’द

कब नज़र में आएगी बे-दाग़ सब्ज़े की बहार

ख़ून के धब्बे धुलेंगे कितनी बरसातों के बा’द

थे बहुत बे-दर्द लम्हे ख़त्म-ए दर्द-ए इश्क़ के

थीं बहुत बे-मेहर सुब्हें मेहरबाँ रातों के बा’द

दिल तो चाहा पर शिकस्त-ए दिल ने मोहलत ही न दी

कुछ गिले शिक्वे भी कर लेते मुनाजातों के बा’द

उन से जो कहने गए थे फ़ैज़ जाँ सदक़े किए

अन-कही ही रह गई वो बात सब बातों के बा’द

 

Click here for background and on any passage for word meanings and explanatory discussion. faiz ahmed faiz (1911-1984) a poet of romance, resistance, labour leader, journalist, political activist, Lenin Peace Prize awardee writes with great finesse and delicacy using the beloved as a metaphor for the homeland and/or the socialist revolution. In 1974, he went to baNgladesh to reconnect with his literary friends and received a cold reception from some because they felt that he was not sufficiently critical of his government and of the army’s brutality. He wrote of his sorrow and disappointment.
1
hum keh Thahre ajnabi1 itni mudaaraatoN2 ke b’aad
phir baneNge aashnaa3 kitni mulaaqaatoN4 ke b’aad  
1.stranger 2.hospitality, welcome 3.familiar, friends 4.meetings, encounters
Even after many generous hospitalities I am still considered a stranger/other. How many encounters will it take before we can become friends again, before we can reconcile.

2
kab nazar1 meN aayegi be-daaGh2 sabze3 ki bahaar
Khuun ke dhabbe4 dhuleNge kitni barsaatoN ke b’aad  
1.sight 2.spotless 3.greenery 4.stains
When will I be able to see such spotless greenery again. How many rains will it take for the stains of blood to wash off.

3
the bahut be-dard1 lamhe2 Khatm3-e dard4-e ishq ke
thiiN bahut be-mehr5 sub’heN6 mehrbaaN7 raatoN ke b’aad   
1.merciless 2.moments, time 3.end, finish 4.pain 5.unkind 6.mornings 7.welcoming
This probably refers to a situation where he had been hosted in the evenings and welcomed warmly, but some friends were missing. The next morning, he recounts who all was not present. These moments of the severence of the ‘pain of love’ were merciless, unkind mornings after welcoming nights.

4
dil to chaahaa par shikast1-e dil ne mohlat2 hi na di
kuchh gile3 shikve4 bhi kar lete munaajaatoN5 ke b’aad    
1.breaking, defeat 2.occasion, time 3.complaint 4.blame 5.prayers, appeals
I dearly wanted to, but my broken heart did not allow me to engage in complaints and blames after all the appeals that I had made.

5
un se jo kahne gaye the faiz jaaN sadqe1 kiye
an-kahi2 hi rah ga’ii vo baat sab baatoN ke b’aad   
1.offering 2.unsaid
O, faiz, that which you went there to say, taking with you an offering of your very soul, had to remain unsaid after everything was said and done.

faiz ahmed faiz (1911-1984) a poet of romance, resistance, labour leader, journalist, political activist, Lenin Peace Prize awardee writes with great finesse and delicacy using the beloved as a metaphor for the homeland and/or the socialist revolution.  In 1974, he went to baNgladesh to reconnect with his literary friends and received a cold reception from some because they felt that he was not sufficiently critical of his government and of the army’s brutality.  He wrote of his sorrow and disappointment.
1
hum keh Thahre ajnabi1 itni mudaaraatoN2 ke b’aad
phir baneNge aashnaa3 kitni mulaaqaatoN4 ke b’aad

1.stranger 2.hospitality, welcome 3.familiar, friends 4.meetings, encounters

Even after many generous hospitalities I am still considered a stranger/other.  How many encounters will it take before we can become friends again, before we can reconcile.
2
kab nazar1 meN aayegi be-daaGh2 sabze3 ki bahaar
Khuun ke dhabbe4 dhuleNge kitni barsaatoN ke b’aad

1.sight 2.spotless 3.greenery 4.stains

When will I be able to see such spotless greenery again.  How many rains will it take for the stains of blood to wash off.
3
the bahut be-dard1 lamhe2 Khatm3-e dard4-e ishq ke
thiiN bahut be-mehr5 sub’heN6 mehrbaaN7 raatoN ke b’aad

1.merciless 2.moments, time 3.end, finish 4.pain 5.unkind 6.mornings 7.welcoming

This probably refers to a situation where he had been hosted in the evenings and welcomed warmly, but some friends were missing.  The next morning, he recounts who all was not present.  These moments of the severence of the ‘pain of love’ were merciless, unkind mornings after welcoming nights.
4
dil to chaahaa par shikast1-e dil ne mohlat2 hi na di
kuchh gile3 shikve4 bhi kar lete munaajaatoN5 ke b’aad

1.breaking, defeat 2.occasion, time 3.complaint 4.blame 5.prayers, appeals

I dearly wanted to, but my broken heart did not allow me to engage in complaints and blames after all the appeals that I had made.
5
un se jo kahne gaye the faiz jaaN sadqe1 kiye
an-kahi2 hi rah ga’ii vo baat sab baatoN ke b’aad

1.offering 2.unsaid

O, faiz, that which you went there to say, taking with you an offering of your very soul, had to remain unsaid after everything was said and done.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *