donoN jahaan de ke vo samjha – raina’s Ghalib

دونوں جہاں دے کے -مرزا  غالب

١

دونوں جہان دے کے وہ سمجھے یہ خوش رہا
یاں آپڑی یہ شرم کہ تکرار کیاکریں

٢

تھک تھک کے ہر مقام پہ دوچار رہ گۓ
تیرا پتا نہ پائیں تو ناچار کیاکریں

٣

کیاشمع کے نہیں  ہیں ہوا خواہ اہلِ بزم
ہو غم ہی جاں گداز  تو غم خوار کیاکریں

दोनों जहान दे के – मिर्ज़ा ग़ालिब

1

दोनों जहान दे के वो समझे ये ख़ुश रहा
याँ आ पड़ी ये शरम कि तकरार क्या करें

2

थक थक के हर मक़ाम पे दो चार रह गए

तेरा पता न पाएं तो ना-चार क्या करें

3

क्या शमा के नहीं हैं हवा-ख़्वाह अह्ल-ए बज़्म
हो ग़म ही जाँ-गुदाज़ तो ग़म-ख़्वार क्या करें

donoN jahaan de ke – mirza Ghalib

Click on any she’r for meanings and discussion.

1
donoN jahaan de ke vo samjhe yih Khush rahaa
yaaN aa paRii1 yih sharm kih takraar2 kyaa kareN
1.to be overwhelmed by 2.argument
Granting us both worlds (here and hereafter) god is satisfied that he (human being) will be happy. But the poet is overwhelmed by this obligation. This interpretation places a playful “mistake” on the part of god, not uncharacteristic of Ghalib. Other interpretations are that “vo” is the beloved. The two worlds that she has granted us are her inner self and her body.We want more, but cannot ask for it for fear of offending her. A third interpretation is that “vo” refers to some highly placed (nawab) benefactor.

2
thak thak ke har maqaam1 pe do chaar2 rah gaye
teraa pataa na paaeN to naa-chaar2 kyaa kareN
1.place, stage 2.two-four i.e.a few 3.helpless
After tiresome effort, reaching a certain stage (not the final stage) a few gave up and stopped. What will the helpless do if they cannot find you. This has clear Sufi mystical implications about searching for/reaching god.

3
kyaa shama ke nahiiN haiN havaa-Khvaah1 ahl-e bazm2
ho Gham hii jaaN-gudaaz3 to Gham-Khvaar4 kyaa kareN
1.well wisher 2.people of the assembly 3.life sapping 4.grief sharer
In Urdu poetry candle is often used as an symbol of life. It burns (is in pain) all night long helplessly. It can be blown off by storms (calamities). It melts (flowing wax is flowing tears) and eventually burns out (dies), and gives light throughout its lifetime. In this picture, the candle is in pain and is burning. Is there no wisher in the assembly who can put it out of its misery? There is an interesting play of words here. “havaa-Khvaah” means well-wisher but literally it also means “air-wisher” – blowing air to put the candle out. “air wisher” can also mean well wisher only for “show and tell”. In the second misra the Gham, pain (of burning) is life sapping, so life-sapping that the empathetic (grief sharer) is helpless, “kya kareN”, what can they do!

donoN jahaan de ke – mirza Ghalib

1
donoN jahaan de ke vo samjhe yih Khush rahaa
yaaN aa paRii1 yih sharm kih takraar2 kyaa kareN

1.to be overwhelmed by 2.argument

Granting us both worlds (here and hereafter) god is satisfied that he (human being) will be happy. But the poet is overwhelmed by this obligation.  This interpretation places a playful “mistake” on the part of god, not uncharacteristic of Ghalib. Other interpretations are that “vo” is the beloved. The two worlds that she has granted us are her inner self and her body.We want more, but cannot ask for it for fear of offending her.  A third interpretation is that “vo” refers to some highly placed (nawab) benefactor.
2
thak thak ke har maqaam1 pe do chaar2 rah gaye
teraa pataa na paaeN to naa-chaar2 kyaa kareN

1.place, stage 2.two-four i.e.a few 3.helpless

After tiresome effort, reaching a certain stage (not the final stage) a few gave up and stopped. What will the helpless do if they cannot find you. This has clear Sufi mystical implications about searching for/reaching god.
3
kyaa shama ke nahiiN haiN havaa-Khvaah1 ahl-e bazm2
ho Gham hii jaaN-gudaaz3 to Gham-Khvaar4 kyaa kareN

1.well wisher 2.people of the assembly 3.life sapping 4.grief sharer

In Urdu poetry candle is often used as an symbol of life. It burns (is in pain) all night long helplessly. It can be blown off by storms (calamities). It melts (flowing wax is flowing tears) and eventually burns out (dies), and gives light throughout its lifetime. In this picture, the candle is in pain and is burning. Is there no wisher in the assembly who can put it out of its misery?  There is an interesting play of words here. “havaa-Khvaah” means well-wisher but literally it also means “air-wisher” – blowing air to put the candle out. “air wisher” can also mean well wisher only for “show and tell”. In the second misra the Gham, pain (of burning) is life sapping, so life-sapping that the empathetic (grief sharer) is helpless, “kya kareN”, what can they do!

donoN jahaan de ke – Raina’s Rendition

1
The lord bestowed both heaven and earth, and believed me quite content
Yet, no contentment but gentle shame does my vaulting wish prevent
2
From wilderness to wilderness, the weary seekers trudge
No compass to suggest the goal, no way by which to judge
3
The flame that lights up the gathering in the heart of the circle lies
Yet they can’t but stand by helplessly, while it dims, flutters and dies

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *