nazar nahiN aati-murli dhar shaad

For word meanings and explanatory discussion in English click on the tabs marked “Roman” or “Notes”.

نظر نہیں آتی ۔ مُرلی دھر شادؔ

۱

چوٹ جب تک اُبھر نہیں آتی

لاکھ دیکھیں نظر نہیں آتی

۲

اُن کو اپنے مریض کی حالت

کیا غضب ہے نظر نہیں آتی

۳

میری قسمت کا فیصلہ معلوم

موت بھی آج اگر نہیں آتی

۴

اب تو رُک رُک کے سانس آتی ہے

اب ہنسی چارہ گر نہیں آتی

۵

تو نہ رِندوں سے بول اے واعظ

بات کرنی اگر نہیں آتی

۶

مر رہا وہ کہاں خدا جانے

دل کی کوئی خبر نہیں آتی

۷

وہ جوانی کے سب کرشمے تھے

اب خوشی بھول کر نہیں آتی

۸

شادؔ صبح قیامت آتی ہے

شامِ غم کی سحر نہیں آتی

नज़र नहीं आती – मुर्लीधर शाद

चोट जब तक उभर नहीं आती

लाख देखें नज़र नहीं आती

उन को अपने मरीज़ की हालत

क्या ग़ज़ब है नज़र नहीं आती

मेरी क़िस्मत का फ़ैस्ला मा’लूम

मौत भी आज अगर नहीं आती

अब तो रुक रुक के सांस आती है

अब हंसी चारागर नहीं आती

तू न रिन्दौं से बोल अए वा’एज़

बात करनी अगर नहीं आती

मर रहा वो कहां ख़ुदा जाने

दिल की कोई ख़बर नहीं आती

वो जवानी के सब करिश्मे थे

अब ख़ुशी भूल कर नहीं आती

शाद सुबह-ए क़यामत आती है

शाम-ए ग़म की सहर नहीं आती

 

Click here for background and on any passage for word meanings and explanatory discussion. murli dhar shaad (~1910?-1950). His diivaan was published posthumously by his uncle, shaNkar lal shaNkar, who was himself a shaa’er and died soon afterwards (~1952). shaad’s father, founder of lyallpur mills and later DCM, established the ‘shaNkar-shaad Memorial Trust’ which organizes annual hind-pak mushaa’era (with political interruptions in 1965 and covid in 2020), aimed at promoting urdu and communal harmony. shaad also organized annual mushaa’era in lyallpur in the 1940s inviting shu’ara from all over India, for the employees of the textile mills. This Ghazal is in the zamin of Ghalib’s ‘koii ummeed bar nahiN aati’.
1
choT jab tak ubhar nahiN aati
laakh dekheN nazar1 nahiN aati  
1.seen, visible
Until and unless the wound swells up, becomes a bruise, you may search for it all you want, but it cannot be seen. This is a reference to the wounded heart, where the poet/lover tries to hide his love before others so as not to malign the reputation of the beloved.

2
un ko apne mareez1 ki haalat2
kya Ghazab3 hai nazar4 nahiN aati  
1.afflicted, sick 2.condition 3.used here to mean injustice 4.seen, visible
The poet/lover refers to himself as one who is afflicted with pain of unrequited love. His condition is pitiful. He feels that it is very unjust that she cannot even see it.

3
meri qismat ka faisla1 m’aaloom
maut2 bhi aaj agar nahiN aati  
1.decision, judgement 2.death
The poet/lover has been pining in love. He knows the ‘faisla’ of the beloved. She is not going to come. But he wishes that his fate would at least allow Death to come and finish his suffering. So, if does not die today, then he will know what the decision is about his fate – continued suffering.

4
ab to ruk ruk ke saaNs aati hai
ab haNsi chaaragar1 nahiN aati   
1.healer
The poet/lover is on his death bed and even his breath is halting, gasping. O, healer, there is no way that I can laugh any more. Healer, here could be the beloved herself.

5
tu na rindoN1 se bol aye vaa’ez2
baat karni agar nahiN aati  
1.wine lovers, patrons of the tavern 2.preacher
The tavern is usually a safe spot for wine lovers/patrons of the tavern – this could well be the wine of love, mysticism that goes beyond the bounds of faith. Occasionally, the preacher shows up at the tavern and lectures/admonishes the patrons trying to pull them into conventional orthodoxy. The poet/reveler does not like this lecture. O, preacher do not talk to wine lovers, if you don’t know how to talk.

6
mar raha vo kahaaN Khuda jaane
dil ki koii Khabar1 nahiN aati   
1.news
The poet/lover has lost his heart and is cursing it – like I don’t know where the hell it is. I do not get any news of the heart. Alternatively, this could be about the qaasid/messenger who has taken his missive to the beloved and has not returned. The poet/lover is waiting to hear about his heart/love.

7
vo javaani ke sub karishme the
ab Khushi bhool kar nahiN aati
1.miracles, illusions   
The poet/lover used to be happy in his youth, perhaps because of having newly fallen in love and still hopeful that the beloved would reciprocate. That was the miracle/illusion of youth, not any realism. Now that he is older, he realizes that happiness will evade him and never ‘come’, even by mistake.

8
shaad1 subah-e qayaamat2 aati hai
shaam3-e Gham4 ki sahar5 nahiN aati  
1.pen-name of the poet 2.doomsday 3.night 4.pain, sorrow 5.dawn
For the poet/lover life is like a long night of pain and sorrow. It will end/dawn will arrive, only if the beloved comes. Of course, she will never come even until doomsday. Thus, O, shaad, doomsday may dawn but the end of the night of sorrow will never be.

murli dhar shaad (~1910?-1950).  His diivaan was published posthumously by his uncle, shaNkar lal shaNkar, who was himself a shaa’er and died soon afterwards (~1952).  shaad’s father, founder of lyallpur mills and later DCM, established the ‘shaNkar-shaad Memorial Trust’ which organizes annual hind-pak mushaa’era (with political interruptions in 1965 and covid in 2020), aimed at promoting urdu and communal harmony.  shaad also organized annual mushaa’era in lyallpur in the 1940s inviting shu’ara from all over India, for the employees of the textile mills.  This Ghazal is in the zamin of Ghalib’s ‘koii ummeed bar nahiN aati’.
1
choT jab tak ubhar nahiN aati
laakh dekheN nazar1 nahiN aati

1.seen, visible

Until and unless the wound swells up, becomes a bruise, you may search for it all you want, but it cannot be seen.  This is a reference to the wounded heart, where the poet/lover tries to hide his love before others so as not to malign the reputation of the beloved.
2
un ko apne mareez1 ki haalat2
kya Ghazab3 hai nazar4 nahiN aati

1.afflicted, sick 2.condition 3.used here to mean injustice 4.seen, visible

The poet/lover refers to himself as one who is afflicted with pain of unrequited love.  His condition is pitiful.  He feels that it is very unjust that she cannot even see it.
3
meri qismat ka faisla1 m’aaloom
maut2 bhi aaj agar nahiN aati

1.decision, judgement 2.death

The poet/lover has been pining in love.  He knows the ‘faisla’ of the beloved.  She is not going to come.  But he wishes that his fate would at least allow Death to come and finish his suffering.  So, if does not die today, then he will know what the decision is about his fate – continued suffering.
4
ab to ruk ruk ke saaNs aati hai
ab haNsi chaaragar1 nahiN aati

1.healer

The poet/lover is on his death bed and even his breath is halting, gasping.  O, healer, there is no way that I can laugh any more.  Healer, here could be the beloved herself.
5
tu na rindoN1 se bol aye vaa’ez2
baat karni agar nahiN aati

1.wine lovers, patrons of the tavern 2.preacher

The tavern is usually a safe spot for wine lovers/patrons of the tavern – this could well be the wine of love, mysticism that goes beyond the bounds of faith.  Occasionally, the preacher shows up at the tavern and lectures/admonishes the patrons trying to pull them into conventional orthodoxy.  The poet/reveler does not like this lecture.  O, preacher do not talk to wine lovers, if you don’t know how to talk.
6
mar raha vo kahaaN Khuda jaane
dil ki koii Khabar1 nahiN aati

1.news

The poet/lover has lost his heart and is cursing it – like I don’t know where the hell it is.  I do not get any news of the heart.  Alternatively, this could be about the qaasid/messenger who has taken his missive to the beloved and has not returned.  The poet/lover is waiting to hear about his heart/love.
7
vo javaani ke sub karishme the
ab Khushi bhool kar nahiN aati

1.miracles, illusions

The poet/lover used to be happy in his youth, perhaps because of having newly fallen in love and still hopeful that the beloved would reciprocate.  That was the miracle/illusion of youth, not any realism.  Now that he is older, he realizes that happiness will evade him and never ‘come’, even by mistake.
8
shaad1 subah-e qayaamat2 aati hai
shaam3-e Gham4 ki sahar5 nahiN aati

1.pen-name of the poet 2.doomsday 3.night 4.pain, sorrow 5.dawn

For the poet/lover life is like a long night of pain and sorrow.  It will end/dawn will arrive, only if the beloved comes.  Of course, she will never come even until doomsday.  Thus, O, shaad, doomsday may dawn but the end of the night of sorrow will never be.

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