umr-e ravaaN mere b’aad-ravish siddiqui

For word meanings and explanatory discussion in English click on the tabs marked “Roman” or “Notes”.

عمرِ رواں میرے بعد ۔ شاہد عزیز روشؔ صدیقی

۱

کیا ہوا ہے کوئی احساسِ زیاں میرے بعد

ہے بہت سُست قدم، عمرِ رواں میرے بعد

۲

خاک آلودۂ اوہام ہے دامانِ نظر

بجھ گئی مشعلِ رُخسارِ بتاں میرے بعد

۳

تھا یقیں کس کو کہ دنیائے وفا میں ہوگا

ہر کہانی پہ حقیقت کا گُماں میرے بعد

۴

جن سے چھوٹا نہ کبھی گوشۂ تمکین و حجاب

وہی آنکھیں ہیں بہ ہر سُو نگراں میرے بعد

۵

کون سنتا تھا یہاں حالِ غمِ دِل لیکن

ہمہ تن گوش ہیں سب اہلِ جہاں میرے بعد

۶

مہ و انجُم بھی تو مجروحِ محبّت ہیں روشؔ

تیر پھینکے ہیں محبّت نے کہاں میرے بعد

उम्र-ए रवां मेरे बाद – शाहेद अज़ीज़ रविश सिद्दीक़ी

क्या हुआ है कोई एहसास-ए ज़ियां मेरे बाद

है बहुत सुस्त क़दम उम्र-ए रवां मेरे बाद

ख़ाक आलूदा-ए औहाम है दामान-ए नज़र

बुझ गई मश’अल-ए रुख़्सार-ए बुतां मेरे बाद

था यक़ीं किस को के दुनिया-ए वफ़ा में होगा

हर कहानी पे हक़ीक़त का गुमां मेरे बाद

जिन से छूटा न कभी गोशा-ए तम्कीन ओ हिजाब

वही आंखें हैं ब-हर सू निगरां मेरे बाद

कौन सुनता था यहां हाल-ए ग़म-ए दिल लैकिन

हम’अ तन गोश हैं सब अहल-ए जहां मेरे बाद

मह ओ अंजुम भी तो मज्रूह-ए मोहब्बत हैं रविश

तीर फैंके हैं मोहब्बत ने कहां मेरे बाद

 

Click here for background and on any passage for word meanings and explanatory discussion. shahid aziz ravish siddiqui (1909-1971) was brought up in a religious atmosphere but in addition to arabi and faarsi, he learnt sanskrit and hindi and was well versed in vedantic literature. A close associate of maulana abul kalam azad he was quite secular in outlook, reflected in this she’r …
ab is se kya Gharaz ye haram hai ki dair hai
baiThe haiN ham to saaya-e diivaar dekh kar
He composed mostly in the classical style with classical themes, with several Ghazal in the ‘zimin’ of Ghalib.

1
kya hua hai koi ehsaas1-e ziyaaN2 mere b’aad
hai bahut sust3 qadam4 umr-e ravaaN5 mere b’aad   
1.feeling, sentiment 2.loss 3.slow 4.step 5.flowing, passing
Has there been any (other) sense/feeling of loss after me. The implication is that there has not been any loss greater than the poet’s death. The pace of life has slowed down, taking slow steps (as if in sorrow), after me.

2
Khaak aalooda1-e auhaam2 hai daamaan3-e nazar
bujh gayii mash’al4-e ruKhsaar5-e butaaN6 mere b’aad    
1.smeared, polluted 2.suspicion, doubt (used here to mean uncertainty/ambiguity) 3.apron, expanse 4.torch, light 5.cheeks, face 6.idols, beloved
The poet could describe the beauty of the beloved in his suKhan in clear terms that everybody could understand. Now that he is gone, the ability see has been smeared with the dust of ambiguity. No one else can shine a light on the beauty of the beloved like he used to be able to do.

3
tha yaqiiN1 kis ko, ke duniya-e vafa2 meN hoga
har kahaani pe haqiiqat3 ka gumaaN4 mere b’aad     
1.certainty, belief 2.fidelity, love 3.truth 4.suspicion
During the poet/lover’s lifetime it was very clear what fidelity/steadfastness in love meant. There was no ambiguity. Everyone who heard it, could believe his story. So, he wonders, who would have believed that after me, in the world of love, there would have been so much ambiguity/doubt about the truth/veracity of every story. The implication is that there has been no lover like him, therefore stories of other lovers are being questioned.

4
jin se chhooTa na kabhi gosha1-e tamkiin2 o hijaab3
vahi aaNkheN haiN ba-har-suu4 nigaraaN5 mere b’aad    
1.corner 2.comfort, tranquility 3.veil, privacy 4.in every direction 5.watching, looking
During the poet/lover’s lifetime the beloved could afford to remain in the corner/refuge in comfort and privacy. Now those very eyes, that used to be comfortable, are looking/searching in all directions. The poet leaves unstated what they are looking for. The implication is that they are looking for an exemplar of fidelity like he was.

5
kaun sunta tha yahaaN haal-e Gham-e dil laikin
ham’a-tan1 gosh2 haiN sub ahl-e-jahaaN3 mere b’aad     
1.head to toe, embodiment 2.ears, listening 3.people of the world
Who has time to listen to the condition/story of the pain of love. But after him, having learnt of the death of a true lover, people of this world are all ears, listening intently for such stories.

6
mah1 o anjum2 bhi to majrooh3-e mohabbat haiN ravish4
tiir phaiNke haiN mohabbat ne kahaaN mere b’aad    
1.moon 2.stars 3.wounded 4.pen name of the poet
While the poet/lover was alive Love knew exactly where to aim its arrows. He was the only rightful target. Now that he is gone, Love is shooting its arrows in every direction. Even the moon and stars have been wounded.

shahid aziz ravish siddiqui (1909-1971) was brought up in a religious atmosphere but in addition to arabi and faarsi, he learnt sanskrit and hindi and was well versed in vedantic literature.  A close associate of maulana abul kalam azad he was quite secular in outlook, reflected in this she’r …
ab is se kya Gharaz ye haram hai ki dair hai
baiThe haiN ham to saaya-e diivaar dekh kar
He composed mostly in the classical style with classical themes, with several Ghazal in the ‘zimin’ of Ghalib.
1
kya hua hai koi ehsaas1-e ziyaaN2 mere b’aad
hai bahut sust3 qadam4 umr-e ravaaN5 mere b’aad

1.feeling, sentiment 2.loss 3.slow 4.step 5.flowing, passing

Has there been any (other) sense/feeling of loss after me.  The implication is that there has not been any loss greater than the poet’s death.  The pace of life has slowed down, taking slow steps (as if in sorrow), after me.
2
Khaak aalooda1-e auhaam2 hai daamaan3-e nazar
bujh gayii mash’al4-e ruKhsaar5-e butaaN6 mere b’aad

1.smeared, polluted 2.suspicion, doubt (used here to mean uncertainty/ambiguity) 3.apron, expanse 4.torch, light 5.cheeks, face 6.idols, beloved

The poet could describe the beauty of the beloved in his suKhan in clear terms that everybody could understand.  Now that he is gone, the ability see has been smeared with the dust of ambiguity.  No one else can shine a light on the beauty of the beloved like he used to be able to do.
3
tha yaqiiN1 kis ko, ke duniya-e vafa2 meN hoga
har kahaani pe haqiiqat3 ka gumaaN4 mere b’aad

1.certainty, belief 2.fidelity, love 3.truth 4.suspicion

During the poet/lover’s lifetime it was very clear what fidelity/steadfastness in love meant.  There was no ambiguity.  Everyone who heard it, could believe his story.  So, he wonders, who would have believed that after me, in the world of love, there would have been so much ambiguity/doubt about the truth/veracity of every story.  The implication is that there has been no lover like him, therefore stories of other lovers are being questioned.
4
jin se chhooTa na kabhi gosha1-e tamkiin2 o hijaab3
vahi aaNkheN haiN ba-har-suu4 nigaraaN5 mere b’aad

1.corner 2.comfort, tranquility 3.veil, privacy 4.in every direction 5.watching, looking

During the poet/lover’s lifetime the beloved could afford to remain in the corner/refuge in comfort and privacy.  Now those very eyes, that used to be comfortable, are looking/searching in all directions.  The poet leaves unstated what they are looking for.  The implication is that they are looking for an exemplar of fidelity like he was.
5
kaun sunta tha yahaaN haal-e Gham-e dil laikin
ham’a-tan1 gosh2 haiN sub ahl-e-jahaaN3 mere b’aad

1.head to toe, embodiment 2.ears, listening 3.people of the world

Who has time to listen to the condition/story of the pain of love.  But after him, having learnt of the death of a true lover, people of this world are all ears, listening intently for such stories.
6
mah1 o anjum2 bhi to majrooh3-e mohabbat haiN ravish4
tiir phaiNke haiN mohabbat ne kahaaN mere b’aad

1.moon 2.stars 3.wounded 4.pen name of the poet

While the poet/lover was alive Love knew exactly where to aim its arrows.  He was the only rightful target.  Now that he is gone, Love is shooting its arrows in every direction.  Even the moon and stars have been wounded.

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