tere naaz mere b’aad-mir taqi mir

For word meanings and explanatory discussion in English click on the tabs marked “Roman” or “Notes”.

ترے ناز میرے بعد ۔ میر تقی میرؔ

۱

آوے گی میری قبر سے آواز میرے بعد

اُبھریں گے عشقِ دل سے ترے راز میرے بعد

۲

جینا مرا تو تجھ کو غنیمت ہے ناسمجھ

کھینچے گا کون پھر یہ ترے ناز میرے بعد

۳

شمع مزار اور یہ سوزِ جگر مرا

ہر شب کریں گے زندگی ناساز میرے بعد

۴

حسرت ہے اُس کے دیکھنے کی دل میں بے قیاس

اغلب کہ میری آنکھیں رہیں باز میرے بعد

۵

کرتا ہوں میں جو نالے سرانجام باغ میں

منہ دیکھو پھر کریں گے ہم آواز میرے بعد

۶

بن گل موا ہی میں تو پہ تو جا کے لوٹیو

صحن چمن میں اے پر پرواز میرے بعد

۷

بیٹھا ہوں میرؔ مرنے کو اپنے میں مستعد

پیدا نہ ہوں گے مجھ سے بھی جانباز میرے بعد

तेरे नाज़ मेरे बा’द – मीर तक़ी मीर

आवेगी मेरी क़ब्र से आवाज़ मेरे बा’द

उभरेंगे इश्क़-ए दिल से तेरे राज़ मेरे बा’द

जीना मेरा तो तुझ को ग़नीमत है ना-समझ

खींचेगा कौन फिर ये तेरे नाज़ मेरे बा’द

शम’अ-ए मज़ार और ये सोज़-ए जिगर मेरा

हर शब करेंगे ज़िंदगी ना-साज़ मेरे बा’द

हस्रत है उस के देखने की दिल में बे-क़यास

अग़्लब के मेरी आँखें रहें बाज़ मेरे बा’द

करता हूँ मैं जो नाले सर-अंजाम बाग़ में

मुँह देखो फिर करेंगे हम-आवाज़ मेरे बा’द

बिन गुल मुआ ही मैं तो प तू जा के लौटियो

सेहन-ए चमन में अए पर-ए पर्वाज़ मेरे बा’द

बैठा हूँ मीर मरने को अपने में मुस्ता’इद

पैदा न होंगे मुझ से भी जाँबाज़ मेरे बा’द

 

Click here for background and on any passage for word meanings and explanatory discussion. mir taqi mir (1722-1810) pioneer of urdu language and Ghazal. Considered a poet of angst and sorrow. He speaks profound thoughts in simple language. This one is much more playful and explicitly romantic. Ghalib has a Ghazal with the same radeef, but a different qaafiya “hai mukarrar lab-e saaqi meN salaa mere b’aad”. There are a few others of Ghalib’s contemporaries and junior contemporaries. I have linked them all together under “Ghalib peshrau ham-asr”.
1
aavegi meri qabr se aavaaz mere b’aad
ubhreNge1 ishq2-e dil se tere raaz3 mere b’aad  
1.emerge 2.love 3.secrets
The poet/lover is dead and buried, but he refuses to be silenced. His voice will be heard from the depths of his grave. The secrets of the love of his heart will emerge after he is gone. What are these secrets – perhaps simply that they poet/lover hid his love in order to not malign the reputation of the beloved, or that he kept all her cruelties under wrap.

2
jiinaa mera to tujh ko Ghanimat1 hai naa-samajh2
khiNchega kaun phir ye tere naaz3 mere b’aad   
1.boon, blessing 2.simpleton, foolish 3.coquetry, demand for attention
Perhaps the beloved is bent upon killing the poet/lover. He protests – my life is a boon to you, O simpleton. Who else can bear the burden of your coquetry or cater to your demands for attention after me!

3
sham’a1-e mazaar2 aur ye soz3-e jigar4 mera
har shab5 kareNge zindagi naa-saaz6 mere b’aad    
1.lamp 2.grave, tomb 3.fire, passion 4.liver/heart 5.night 6.uncomfortable
After the poet/lover’s death, the lamp burning at his tomb and the fire/passion of his heart/love will return as memories and make the beloved uncomfortable every night.

4
hasrat1 hai us ke dekhne ki dil meN be-qayaas2
aGhlab3 keh meri aaNkheN raheN baaz4 mere b’aad   
1.longing 2.without ambiguity i.e., certainly 3.most probably, fearing that 4.deprived
The poet/lover is fearful that his eyes will be deprived of the sight of the beloved afte he is dead and buried. So, he has a longing to see her fully and clearly.

5
karta huN maiN jo naale1 sar-anjaam2 baaGh meN
muNh dekho phir kareNge ham-aavaaz3 mere b’aad   
1.cry, wail, lamentation 2.accomplish, complete 3.used here to mean ‘copy cats’
The poet/lover laments loudly because of the pain of unrequited love. After he is gone, others will try to emulate him, watch me, he says.

6
bin1 gul2 muaa3 hi maiN to, pa4 tuu jaa ke lauTiyo
sahn5-e chaman meN aye par-e-parvaaz6 mere b’aad   
1.without 2.rose, beloved 3.died 4.but 5.yard, open space 6.wing in flight
In the first misra ‘gul-rose’ most probably refers to the beauty of the beloved. In the second misra ‘par-e parvaaz – wing in flight’, is a free bird – the bulbul which, in poetic convention is deeply in love with the rose. Thus, the poet himself, without access to the rose, died of sorrow. But he calls upon the bulbul to go the garden again and again (jaa ke lauTiyo), to pay attention to the rose.

7
baiThaa huN mir1 marne ko apne meN musta’ed2
paidaa na hoNge mujh se bhi jaaNbaaz3 mere b’aad  
1.pen-name of the poet 2.girded loins, ready, prepared 3.laying down life for something or someone
O mir, I am ready, fully prepared, to the die at the hands of the beloved (to prove my love/fidelity). There will not be another brave lover like me after I am gone.

mir taqi mir (1722-1810) pioneer of urdu language and Ghazal.  Considered a poet of angst and sorrow.  He speaks profound thoughts in simple language.  This one is much more playful and explicitly romantic.  Ghalib has a Ghazal with the same radeef, but a different qaafiya “hai mukarrar lab-e saaqi meN salaa mere b’aad”.  There are a few others of Ghalib’s contemporaries and junior contemporaries.  I have linked them all together under “Ghalib peshrau ham-asr”.
1
aavegi meri qabr se aavaaz mere b’aad
ubhreNge1 ishq2-e dil se tere raaz3 mere b’aad

1.emerge 2.love 3.secrets

The poet/lover is dead and buried, but he refuses to be silenced.  His voice will be heard from the depths of his grave.  The secrets of the love of his heart will emerge after he is gone.  What are these secrets – perhaps simply that they poet/lover hid his love in order to not malign the reputation of the beloved, or that he kept all her cruelties under wrap.
2
jiinaa mera to tujh ko Ghanimat1 hai naa-samajh2
khiNchega kaun phir ye tere naaz3 mere b’aad

1.boon, blessing 2.simpleton, foolish 3.coquetry, demand for attention

Perhaps the beloved is bent upon killing the poet/lover.  He protests – my life is a boon to you, O simpleton.  Who else can bear the burden of your coquetry or cater to your demands for attention after me!
3
sham’a1-e mazaar2 aur ye soz3-e jigar4 mera
har shab5 kareNge zindagi naa-saaz6 mere b’aad

1.lamp 2.grave, tomb 3.fire, passion 4.liver/heart 5.night 6.uncomfortable

After the poet/lover’s death, the lamp burning at his tomb and the fire/passion of his heart/love will return as memories and make the beloved uncomfortable every night.
4
hasrat1 hai us ke dekhne ki dil meN be-qayaas2
aGhlab3 keh meri aaNkheN raheN baaz4 mere b’aad

1.longing 2.without ambiguity i.e., certainly 3.most probably, fearing that 4.deprived

The poet/lover is fearful that his eyes will be deprived of the sight of the beloved afte he is dead and buried.  So, he has a longing to see her fully and clearly.
5
karta huN maiN jo naale1 sar-anjaam2 baaGh meN
muNh dekho phir kareNge ham-aavaaz3 mere b’aad

1.cry, wail, lamentation 2.accomplish, complete 3.used here to mean ‘copy cats’

The poet/lover laments loudly because of the pain of unrequited love.  After he is gone, others will try to emulate him, watch me, he says.
6
bin1 gul2 muaa3 hi maiN to, pa4 tuu jaa ke lauTiyo
sahn5-e chaman meN aye par-e-parvaaz6 mere b’aad

1.without 2.rose, beloved 3.died 4.but 5.yard, open space 6.wing in flight

In the first misra ‘gul-rose’ most probably refers to the beauty of the beloved.  In the second misra ‘par-e parvaaz – wing in flight’, is a free bird – the bulbul which, in poetic convention is deeply in love with the rose.  Thus, the poet himself, without access to the rose, died of sorrow.  But he calls upon the bulbul to go the garden again and again (jaa ke lauTiyo), to pay attention to the rose.
7
baiThaa huN mir1 marne ko apne meN musta’ed2
paidaa na hoNge mujh se bhi jaaNbaaz3 mere b’aad

1.pen-name of the poet 2.girded loins, ready, prepared 3.laying down life for something or someone

O mir, I am ready, fully prepared, to the die at the hands of the beloved (to prove my love/fidelity).  There will not be another brave lover like me after I am gone.

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